Mathematics

maths - aims

Aims And Vision

Mathematics affects every aspect of our lives: wages, phone tariffs, journey times, computers, the probability we will win the lottery, etc. In order to function effectively in modern society it is essential that everyone is competent and confident with Mathematics.

The vision of this department is not only to provide pupils with the mathematical skills necessary for modern life but also to instil in them an enthusiasm for and enjoyment of Mathematics.

The Mathematics Department seeks to:
– provide a stimulating, safe and happy environment in which pupils and staff can strive to achieve full academic, personal and professional potential;
– ensure each pupil realises their mathematical potential and to assist each pupil to gain any qualification necessary for their chosen career path;
– identify any pupil who has an aptitude for mathematics and develop, stimulate and encourage them to excel in mathematics;
– identify any pupil who is experiencing difficulties in mathematics and provide support and guidance to assist them in gaining a useful qualification in mathematics;
– develop qualities of self-esteem, self-reliance, adaptability and self-discipline in each pupil;
– provide professional development and fulfilment for each member of staff in the department;

Learning

maths - learning

Magazine Article

Banbridge Academy Magazine 2015-2016: Mathematics Article

Key Stage 3

In Key Stage 3, our pupils receive 5 timetabled periods of Mathematics. The classes are taught in their registration groups.

Pupils will follow the Revised Curriculum for Mathematics and Numeracy which includes the element of Financial Capability.

The curriculum covers the areas of Number, Algebra, Shape, Space and Measure as well as Data Handling.

Pupils will have the opportunity to develop:

  • Creative thinking in their approach to solving mathematical problems
  • Competence in mental mathematics skills
  • Competence in pencil and paper methods
  • Confidence in the use of mathematical language and notation
  • Practical skills using technology

GCSE Mathematics

At GCSE, our pupils receive 5 timetabled periods of Mathematics. There are 9 classes which are streamed. All pupils are prepared for the CCEA High Level Modular course. Seven classes are entered for Modules T4 and T6 and two classes are entered for Modules T3 and T6. Pupils are given the opportunity to sit module T3 or T4 in January of Year 12. All pupils take module T6 in May/ June of Year 12.
Modules
T3 covers Grades D, C, B
T4 covers Grades B, A, A*

Completion Module
T6 covers Grades D, C, B, A, A*
There is no Controlled Assessment for GCSE Mathematics.

maths - pupils

GCSE Further Mathematics

Pupils who are good at Maths and who enjoy Maths have the opportunity to take GCSE Further Mathematics. It is a totally distinct subject from GCSE Mathematics. Topics encountered in GCSE Mathematics, such as trigonometry, are studied in greater depth. Also new ideas and topics, such as differentiation and integration are introduced. GCSE Further Mathematics provides an excellent platform for studying A’ Level Mathematics.

Students will have the same teacher as they have for GCSE Mathematics. They will have 4 periods in Year 11 and 5 periods in Year 12.

The subject is enjoyable but demanding, requiring commitment and good concentration.

The course consists of 3 branches of Mathematics:-

  • Pure Mathematics – includes Algebra, Trigonometry and Calculus
  • Mechanics – includes Vectors, Forces and Equations of Motion
  • Statistics – includes Probability, Averages and Measures of Spread

There are 2 written papers which are taken in May/June of Year 12. There is no Controlled Assessment for GCSE Further Mathematics.

AS/A2 Mathematics

Mathematics is a popular and useful A level. The subject keeps many avenues and doors open. It assists in the study of other A levels (especially Physics) and encourages rigorous, organised thought.

AS Year

  • Students study 2 Pure Modules C1 and C2 and 1 Mechanics Module M1
  • Students will have 8 periods of teaching a week
  • Students will have the same teacher for all modules
  • Students will sit all 3 modules in May/June of Year 13

A2 Year

  • Students study 2 Pure Modules C3 and C4 and 1 statistics Module S1
  • Students will have 9 periods of teaching a week
  • Students will have the same teacher for all 3 modules
  • Students will sit the 3 modules in May/June of Year 14

Each Module is assessed by a 1½ hour exam. All modules carry equal marks.

There is no coursework component in A Level maths.

All 6 modules carry equal marks.

To achieve a Grade A students must average 80% or more in their 6 modules. To achieve an A* they need to average 80% or more in all 6 modules and average 90% or more in modules C3 and C4.

Mathematics is useful and beneficial to those thinking of degrees/careers in

  • Mathematics
  • Physics, Chemistry, Biology
  • Medical Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Computer Science or Software Design
  • Accountancy, Actuarial Science, Finance, Banking, Economics or Business

For those unsure about their career direction, Mathematics is a good option, as it develops reasoning and problem solving skills and is accepted for most university degree courses.

AS/A2 Further Mathematics

Further Mathematics can only be taken as a fourth subject. It should be considered by students who are genuinely enthusiastic about Mathematics. Topics encountered in A level Mathematics are developed to a greater degree and some new ideas are introduced. Students who have studied Further Mathematics will have a big advantage over others in the first year of most Mathematical, Scientific and Engineering degree courses.

AS Year

  • Students study 1 Pure Module FP1, 1 Mechanics Module M2 and 1 Statistics Module S2
  • Students will have 8 periods of teaching a week
  • The modules are taught by 3 different teachers
  • All 3 modules will be examined at the end of Year 13

A2 Year

  • Students study 2 Pure Module FP2 and FP3 and  1 Mechanics Module M3
  • Students will have 9 periods of teaching a week
  • The modules are taught by 3 different teachers
  • All 3 modules will be examined at the end of Year 14

Each Module is assessed by a 1½ hour exam. All modules carry equal marks.

There is no coursework component in A Level Further Maths.

All 6 modules carry equal marks. To achieve a Grade A students must average 80% or more in their 6 modules. To achieve an A* they need to average 80% or more in all 6 modules and average 90% or more in any 3 of the modules FP2, FP3, M2, M3 or S2.

Further Mathematics should be considered seriously by those contemplating degrees/careers in

  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Engineering
  • Computer Science

Any of the above subjects at Oxford or Cambridge.

UKMT Mathematical Challenge

The Mathematics department enters pupils for the UK Mathematical Challenge every year. This is organised by the United Kingdom Mathematics Trust from the School of Mathematics, University of Leeds. The challenges are lively, intriguing multiple choice question papers which are designed to stimulate an interest in mathematics and to develop problem solving skills.

Gold, Silver and Bronze certificates are awarded to the best 40% of national participants. The most successful participants are also invited to enter follow-on rounds or the Maths Olympiad.

There are three levels of challenge:

  • Junior for Years 8 and 9
  • Intermediate for Years 11 and 12
  • Senior for Years 13 and 14.

Children In Crossfire Maths Challenge

Children In Crossfire is a Northern Ireland based charity. Children in Crossfire’s projects invest in children’s futures through education and health care programmes. This annual Challenge event is designed to bring schools together, using the domain of mathematics, to provide a platform for pupils to both collaborate and compete, giving them a highly enjoyable experience that is both academically and pastorally rewarding.

Participating in the CIC Maths Challenge enables us to:

  • promote a positive ethos of using mathematics
  • collaborate and compete with other schools at home and abroad
  • provide active shared learning opportunities for pupils
  • raise attitudes and dispositions to mathematics
  • support less fortunate children in other parts of the world

All eight Year 10 classes take part in the CIC Challenge in February. The students work in groups to solve a series of interesting and stimulating problems. The problems provoke much discussion and debate. The students make a £1 donation to the charity.